Tag Archives: Cologne

Arnoldi Mylij – printer/bookseller

I’ve just started reading Peter Blayney’s first tome on the Company of Stationers. It is a weighty book not only because of its contents, but literally heavy in terms of its construction. It is choc full of information about the formation of this most important association, and I have already learned the difference between scriveners, limners and textwriters….And I won’t tell you; you’ll need to get volume one for your self.

To cut a long story short, as I am reading about this English association, I am wondering whether other important printing centres had similar organisations. I keep searching. In the meantime, let me show you some initials and fleurons created or used by Arnoldus Mylij. The following information has been gathered from a variety of sources on the internet, notably the CERL thesaurus and the Wikipedias of Luxembourg and France, as well as other bits of information as found in Google books.

Arnold Mylius, or Arnoldus Mylij, born on October 16, 1540 in Vryemoersheim (Friemersheim) in the former county of Moers, died on November 17, 1604 in Cologne. He was a printer and book dealer, active in Cologne between 1585 to 1604. Arnold Mylius was from the family of Myliusse of Dudelange and probably the brother of the famous Jean (John) Mylius.

His father was Herman Mylius and his mother Marguerite von Werdt. After his education, Arnold Mylius  learned the book trade in Antwerp in the establishment of Arnold Birckmann and took over the management as Managing Director for the trust of the heirs of Birckmann. He opened his own printing press, which gained a great reputation and from 1585 was the sole owner of the publishing house “Fat hens” by Arnold Birckmann

For religious reasons, it seems that he moved to Cologne and married a young woman from the family of Birckmann, Barbara Birckmann. She died on April 24, 1596. The couple had three children: Arnold, Marguerite and Herman.

Mylius took part in the public life of the City of Cologne, becoming a Senator of the City. He was buried in the Saint Peter church in Cologne.

In 1576 Arnold worked with Plantin to print the 5th volume of Augustine’s Opera. He paid for half the cost of the paper and the printing, receiving in exchange half the edition to sell. Between 1586 and 1604  he published  over 200 books. The more I research the more I find that there is a very blurred line between bookseller/publisher/printer; a line that changes drastically when publishers are no longer technical middlemen, but deal more concretely with writers and editors than with printers and bookbinders.

Here are some books that I have found:

 

Books attributed to Mylius include:
• contrib.: Commentariorum ac disputationum in tertiam partem Diui Thomæ. Tomus tertius. : Qui est primus de sacramentis ; in quo ea continentur, quae post praefationem indicantur / (Moguntiæ : Ex officina typographica Balthasari Lippij : Sumptibus Arnoldi Mylij., Anno, M.D. IC), by Francisco Suárez, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Balthasar Lipp, also contrib. by Weston School of Theology and Domus Lugdunensis

* contrib.: Ioannis Genesii Sepuluedæ Cordubensis Sacrosanctæ Theologiæ Doctoris, Caroli V. Imperatoris, historici. Opera, quæ reperiri potuerunt omnia. / (Coloniae Agrippinae, : In officina Birckmannica, sumptibus Arnoldi Mylij., Anno M. DCII), by Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda and printer Officina Birckmannica.

 

Below are some samples of Mylius’ printed historiated capitals dated to 1589, found in “Historiarum indicarum” by Maffei, (MRB Q950.3/17A1) found at the State Library of NSW

Here are some headers, tailpiece and fleurons from printed and published by Arnold and Herman Mylius between 1591 and 1642:

And lastly let’s look at some historiated capitals used by Arnold’s son Herman, in 1647 “Vita et martyrivm S. Vrsvlæ et sociarum undecim millium virginum” (RBq CLI 3908) from the National Library of Australia. I am always interested in seeing how much gets recycled not only within one book, but also from book to book and through time. I have also included letters from the 1622  “De triplici virtute theologica, fide, spe, et charitate / Francisci Suarez” also at the National Library of Australia for comparison. I have taken measurements, but didn’t feel it necessary to include in this post.

As I visit other state libraries this spring and summer, I look forward to corroborating the letters I have already collected and completing missing elements.

There were interesting watermarks, by the way, but that’s for another post.

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Booksleuthing some more in an Australian colonial library

Booksleuthing; how I love that term. Yes I feel like a detective of books, finding out about how they were made, who printed them, and the significance of their images. I was never very good at symbolism, and this is a great big learning curve of imagery.

A few months back I visited Sonia’s library at Bedervale. Here is a reminder.

I returned this week for champagne and cheese, and while passing by the library, I couldn’t help but take a few more pictures and search some books.

I found a nice, if not somewhat worn, example of tree calf marbling:

This is a tricky process process involving water and ferrous sulphate being dropped on a piece of leather already attached to the covers. That is a very simple explanation indeed, and there are many articles written on the subject, one of which can be found at Hewitt’s website

However, this article is not about tree calf marbling, rather about discovery.

Lesley had been completely entranced by a travel guide to Syria and Egypt, printed in 1788. Using my handy phone torch in lieu of light sheet, I found these fleur de lis watermarks at the gutter and on the edges of the pages.

The above watermarks reminded me of these below:

This is the first time I have been able to find the same marks in differing books. The one above are in a book printed in 1810 in London,

Introduccion para la historia de la revolucion de Espana bound with An exposure of the arts and machinations which led to the usurpation of the crown of Spain. London, 1808. (RB CLI 3320)

Note that the mark on the left is most similar to the ones I found in the colonial travel book as it is positioned between the chainlines.

Interesting!

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Finding the Virgin Mary

Last day of the week; last book on the pile. And there she was, staring at me, the baby Jesus in her arms.

Virgin Mary holding Jesus, standing in a boat

Virgin Mary holding Jesus, standing in a boat

Found in

RB MISC 3181
Ignatii Coutino … : mariale, sive conciones super evangelia festivitatum sacratissimae Virginis Mariae:

The google translation is : Ignatius Coutino: marian, sermons on the Gospels or the most sacred festivals of the Virgin Mary.

I’m not sure whether she is standing in a boat; what else could it be. The image is fine and is located on the fly leaves.

Isn’t it just amazing? There were no watermarks that I could discern in the book.  The book itself is squarish; blind tooled leather over paste boards; 3 double cords, laced in.The text was printed in Cologne in 1661.

I just thought you might be interested…..

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