Tag Archives: historiated capitals

Arnoldi Mylij – printer/bookseller

I’ve just started reading Peter Blayney’s first tome on the Company of Stationers. It is a weighty book not only because of its contents, but literally heavy in terms of its construction. It is choc full of information about the formation of this most important association, and I have already learned the difference between scriveners, limners and textwriters….And I won’t tell you; you’ll need to get volume one for your self.

To cut a long story short, as I am reading about this English association, I am wondering whether other important printing centres had similar organisations. I keep searching. In the meantime, let me show you some initials and fleurons created or used by Arnoldus Mylij. The following information has been gathered from a variety of sources on the internet, notably the CERL thesaurus and the Wikipedias of Luxembourg and France, as well as other bits of information as found in Google books.

Arnold Mylius, or Arnoldus Mylij, born on October 16, 1540 in Vryemoersheim (Friemersheim) in the former county of Moers, died on November 17, 1604 in Cologne. He was a printer and book dealer, active in Cologne between 1585 to 1604. Arnold Mylius was from the family of Myliusse of Dudelange and probably the brother of the famous Jean (John) Mylius.

His father was Herman Mylius and his mother Marguerite von Werdt. After his education, Arnold Mylius  learned the book trade in Antwerp in the establishment of Arnold Birckmann and took over the management as Managing Director for the trust of the heirs of Birckmann. He opened his own printing press, which gained a great reputation and from 1585 was the sole owner of the publishing house “Fat hens” by Arnold Birckmann

For religious reasons, it seems that he moved to Cologne and married a young woman from the family of Birckmann, Barbara Birckmann. She died on April 24, 1596. The couple had three children: Arnold, Marguerite and Herman.

Mylius took part in the public life of the City of Cologne, becoming a Senator of the City. He was buried in the Saint Peter church in Cologne.

In 1576 Arnold worked with Plantin to print the 5th volume of Augustine’s Opera. He paid for half the cost of the paper and the printing, receiving in exchange half the edition to sell. Between 1586 and 1604  he published  over 200 books. The more I research the more I find that there is a very blurred line between bookseller/publisher/printer; a line that changes drastically when publishers are no longer technical middlemen, but deal more concretely with writers and editors than with printers and bookbinders.

Here are some books that I have found:

 

Books attributed to Mylius include:
• contrib.: Commentariorum ac disputationum in tertiam partem Diui Thomæ. Tomus tertius. : Qui est primus de sacramentis ; in quo ea continentur, quae post praefationem indicantur / (Moguntiæ : Ex officina typographica Balthasari Lippij : Sumptibus Arnoldi Mylij., Anno, M.D. IC), by Francisco Suárez, Saint Thomas Aquinas, and Balthasar Lipp, also contrib. by Weston School of Theology and Domus Lugdunensis

* contrib.: Ioannis Genesii Sepuluedæ Cordubensis Sacrosanctæ Theologiæ Doctoris, Caroli V. Imperatoris, historici. Opera, quæ reperiri potuerunt omnia. / (Coloniae Agrippinae, : In officina Birckmannica, sumptibus Arnoldi Mylij., Anno M. DCII), by Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda and printer Officina Birckmannica.

 

Below are some samples of Mylius’ printed historiated capitals dated to 1589, found in “Historiarum indicarum” by Maffei, (MRB Q950.3/17A1) found at the State Library of NSW

Here are some headers, tailpiece and fleurons from printed and published by Arnold and Herman Mylius between 1591 and 1642:

And lastly let’s look at some historiated capitals used by Arnold’s son Herman, in 1647 “Vita et martyrivm S. Vrsvlæ et sociarum undecim millium virginum” (RBq CLI 3908) from the National Library of Australia. I am always interested in seeing how much gets recycled not only within one book, but also from book to book and through time. I have also included letters from the 1622  “De triplici virtute theologica, fide, spe, et charitate / Francisci Suarez” also at the National Library of Australia for comparison. I have taken measurements, but didn’t feel it necessary to include in this post.

As I visit other state libraries this spring and summer, I look forward to corroborating the letters I have already collected and completing missing elements.

There were interesting watermarks, by the way, but that’s for another post.

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James Flesher: Printer for the City of London Publishers

My next project is a beauty! It’s all about printing. But what about the bindings?

The most exciting part of this research is memory. I am looking at headers and letters. I could swear I’d seen some of them before? But have I really? I have come to wonder if they didn’t copy each other’s designs. Or maybe they swapped or sold type to each other. Sometimes the same design appears in different sizes. Easy to do with a computer today, but imagine having to make three or four sizes by hand?

In the blur of information, it seems that designs were used and recycled by printers. Could this be true?

In my research for The Perfume of Books, I came across James Flesher.  Flesher, or Fletcher(?) was the son of Miles Flesher, printer, and father of Miles II, bookseller. He lived and worked in Little Britain, a part of London in around 1650. I had to look up Little Britain, because I have come across this term quite a bit lately, and of course there is the television series. I never realised it was a real street in London. I trawl the Internet for information, Wikipedia, the CERL database. Sometimes I am lucky to get a lot of information on printer’s lives. Sometimes there is hardly any. All I have at hand are books which Flesher printed. Many of Flesher’s books have red ruled title pages.  The Criticri Sacri interestingly enough, has no historiated capitals. The letters are quite plain, as is the paragraphing.

The capital letters were all taken from the books below. If you look at the “T”, Flesher had many designs. The thistle appears quite a lot in this period, not just with Flesher, but with other printers as well.

1660 Ductor Dubitantium or the rule of conscience in all her generall measures RBq CLI 4226 (NLA)

 

1660 Critici sacri: give doctissimorum virorum in SS biblia RBq De Vesci 65 (NLA)

 

1662 Basilika: the workes of King Charles the martyr : with a collection of declarations, treaties and other papers concerning the differences betwixt His said Majesty and his two Houses of Parliament RBq De Vesci 1076 (NLA)


1665 The history of the Church of Scotland : beginning the year of Our Lord 203, and continued to the end of the reign of King James the VI ,RBq MISC 112  (NLA)

I am sifting through the thousands of photos I have amassed, and looking to complete alphabets. I’ll keep posting about printers, their bindings and their type.

Thanks for reading. Comments appreciated.

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