Lesson learned in the bindery today

It had been my intention to post photos of today’s production. But worker No2 was busy playing the cello while worker No1 had her hands full of glue.

In my pleasant workshop I was devising ways in which I could bind the Perfume of Books; the hardest part is coming up with a design. Initially I was going to use the paper stock I had. As the book has grown to 400 pages, and weighs one kilo, I couldn’t make paper bindings. Sides are ok, but a paper spine, for a book I hope will get much used, would not be appropriate.  Besides which, the paper bought in fits and starts from various suppliers doesn’t actually suit the theme of the book.

So I am left to use cloth and some papers for the sides.

This is the most consistent binding time I have had in a long while. And then it hit me that I still needed to add a title to the cover. Too many things to think about at one, and with so little time.

I like horizontal stripes. I do think that less is more. I like plats rapportés, a kind of simplified binding, where the covering material goes over the sandwiched spine.

I like having lines going across one side to the other

I like having lines going across one side to the other

I also like millimeter binding

Type of millimetre binding

Type of millimetre binding

Will I be using leather or paper? Still how do I get the title on.

The type I have is too small for the size of this book, and I will be going to a tooling workshop with Dominic Riley way after the books are due, so I guess it’s up to my printer and me. I can print on japanese paper, and after a bit of swearing I can print on cloth; afterall I wanted to keep the style of the title Susan designed for me.

So the books will be made in 3 pieces, with a hollow. Is that cheating or is that actually making more work for myself?

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Lesson 1: This pile of books now has their spine linings and inner boards attached. I found when I was trying a millimetre binding that this was an impediment to adding a piece of leather across the top of the binding. Millimetre binding can occur either as a case binding or with laced-in boards; it is harder to do when it is a strange combination of both. Photos to come….

Lesson 2: When covering a board for simplified binding or plats rapportés, don’t glue down the spine side first as it will create tension in the paper and will result in diagonal lines  along the paper.

Lesson 3: clean your remay so that you don’t have glue left on it. It will transfer onto your paper.

I wish my students could watch me; they would hear me talk to myself as well as get glue all over my fingers. But they would see me learn from previous experience and use patience to case-in my book and leave it open. Photo to come…..

I went to the Code X, the international bookbinders’ exhibition that is part of the Australian Bookbinders’ Conference. There were apparently 25 different binding styles. And at least 4 bindings in New Oriental binding, including mine.  However the bindings inspired me; made me think about my own design issues.

Lesson 4: patience is a virtue. Wit for things to dry before going to the next stage.

After all this talk I still have only bound 3 books….

 

 

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