A little research and hooray: answers to pesky watermark questions

You may or may not know that I am currently finalising research into watermarks, and putting the data into a book form.

So as I work on setting the data for the designer to change it into a book, I revisit watermarks I haven’t seen for while.This chase is very elusive. More often than not I am going around in circles. And with so much information entering my brain I feel like i am just a big sponge.

This week however I have been lucky. The watermark in Albrecht Durer’s head has been identified. It is not a self portrait as I had once surmised, but a work by one Erhard Schon. He is reported as having used a medallion as his inspiration for this portrait.

I found this print in a non contemporary rebind of the 1511 Passio Domini.

 

Portrait by Erhard Schon

Watermark in Albrecht Durer’s head – note the date 1527 and the AD upper left corner

coat of arms

Coat of arms of the city of Nuremberg; on the left side it is supposed to be an eagle with wings displayed. Looks more like a bear licking its paw. I can find no other. So dating is incredibly hard to do.

Here are pictures of both rebinds: on the Left the newest version, and on the right the older version, still not an original binding.

 

IN the new rebind the plates had been taken off their supporting material and placed on fresh acid free Barcham Green paper.

I am still not sure the mystery of this watermark is solved..

The other mark is this one:

Coat of arm of Augsburg

Grapes on candelabra? No. Coat of arms of Augsburg

This coat of arms has a pine cone on a type of bollard. It looks to me like a bunch of grapes rather than the pine cone.

This representation shows the design for the coat of arms; notice the shape of the cone and the platform on which it sits.

The watermark on the right is similar to the one I found, except I do believe that mine consists of a bollard as there is an oblong shape going into the cone.

Dard Hunter and other historians talk much about the paper that printers used. However, the papermakers who supplied these printers remain in the dark. I would like to know from whom or where  Albrecht Durer was supplied paper. Mystere and boule de gomme as the French say!

I still have other mysteries to solve.

Thanks for reading

 

 

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